ofools
fuckyeahladies-fictionalandreal:

You know what’s not fucking cool? Cultural appropriation.
You know what is fucking cool? Buying clothing inspired by a culture that is designed by the people of that culture.
Think Native styles are cool? Here, let introduce you to Patricia Michaels of Toas Pueblo. She is a Native woman who designs amazing clothes inspired by her heritage. She knows what from her culture is appropriate for mass-production and what is meant to be sacred, hand-made, or inherited. When you buy her clothes (available at her store Waterlily), or any Native person’s products, you’re giving your money directly to the cultures you claim to respect and admire. When you buy bullshit knockoffs from American Eagle, however, you’re being an asshole.
And seriously though look at her clothes they’re fucking amazing this woman is wild talented. 

fuckyeahladies-fictionalandreal:

You know what’s not fucking cool? Cultural appropriation.

You know what is fucking cool? Buying clothing inspired by a culture that is designed by the people of that culture.

Think Native styles are cool? Here, let introduce you to Patricia Michaels of Toas Pueblo. She is a Native woman who designs amazing clothes inspired by her heritage. She knows what from her culture is appropriate for mass-production and what is meant to be sacred, hand-made, or inherited. When you buy her clothes (available at her store Waterlily), or any Native person’s products, you’re giving your money directly to the cultures you claim to respect and admire. When you buy bullshit knockoffs from American Eagle, however, you’re being an asshole.

And seriously though look at her clothes they’re fucking amazing this woman is wild talented. 

gothiccharmschool
I love lipstick. I want to write an essay about the politics of lipstick. I like lipstick that’s deep, deep red. I like lipstick that’s purple, lipstick that’s black and dark for when I want to dress up my melancholy. I like sharing lipstick with sisters. and I laugh at boys that think I wear lipstick for them to notice, I laugh, lipstick is an art you can’t ever understand. from picking out a color, testing it on the inside of my wrist, pursing my lips during the application of it. I like when I kiss a baby and leave lipstick on their cheek, when you hug someone and leave lipstick on their shirt, when it gets on your teeth and you use your tongue to get it off, when you sleep in lipstick and wake up with it on your pillow case. in 1997 mama left for Ethiopia to see her mama for the first time in 12 years. I was six and I cried the entire way home from the airport. and when we came home there on the kitchen table was the teacup mama had been drinking out of. at the bottom a sip of tea and black cardamom seeds. and there on the rim of the cup the lipstick imprint of my mama’s kiss.

nomad manifesto

this is the most beautiful thing i have ever read

(via fashinpirate)

moonlitwitch
arrowsforpens:

thejunglenook:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully EffectOne of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.
— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Actual conversation in my lab:Male coworker: “Why is everyone so obsessed with Scully?She’s not *that special*. Why aren’t they talking about other female scientists in the media?”Me:
*I know there is Bones and The Big Bang Theory, but how about some media featuring women in STEM that aren’t defined by their romantic relationships?

Let’s not bring up The Big Bang Theory as an example of feminist anything, because it isn’t. 

arrowsforpens:

thejunglenook:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully Effect

One of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.

Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.

The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.

— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Actual conversation in my lab:
Male coworker: “Why is everyone so obsessed with Scully?She’s not *that special*. Why aren’t they talking about other female scientists in the media?”
Me:


*I know there is Bones and The Big Bang Theory, but how about some media featuring women in STEM that aren’t defined by their romantic relationships?

Let’s not bring up The Big Bang Theory as an example of feminist anything, because it isn’t. 

fuckyeahriotgrrrl
dynastylnoire:

writeswrongs:

By now I hope at least some of you have heard of Javier Payne, a 14-year-old black boy from the Bronx who was attacked by the NYPD last weekend as he was walking home from a hookah shop in his neighborhood.
Cops said he was fighting with another boy, a 13-year-old neighbor in the area. 
So what do you do when two boys are fighting? 
Well, if you’re the NYPD, and the boys in question are black, you throw one of them through a window, puncturing his lung. As he lies there with blood filling his lungs, you handcuff him and refuse to call an ambulance. When you do call an ambulance, you enter the protocol for an adult drunk, instead of a dying child. When the ambulance comes, you refuse to let the paramedics uncuff him. Even as the paramedics explain that this boy is dying, you argue that he’s faking it and that he deserves to die there on the street for fighting with another boy.  When you finally do let the paramedics uncuff him and take him to the hospital, you fail to report that you threw him through a glass window despite dozens of eye-witnesses reporting the opposite.  When you are called upon by the community to account for your actions, you decide to do an “internal investigation” - therefore being accountable to no one outside your division. You encourage the deregulation of police conduct and refuse to let outsiders investigate how you train your officers.
And what do you do, if you’re a concerned citizen who is tired of seeing this? You write Bill de Blasio and you ask him to start an outside investigation into police brutality.  Or at least that’s what I did. And if you want to cosign what I wrote him, you can do that here. And if you want to signal boost that for Javier Payne, you can do that too. You can sign my petition letter here.
(Photo Credit to Enid Alvarez for the New York Daily News)

booooooooooooooooooooooooooooost

dynastylnoire:

writeswrongs:

By now I hope at least some of you have heard of Javier Payne, a 14-year-old black boy from the Bronx who was attacked by the NYPD last weekend as he was walking home from a hookah shop in his neighborhood.

Cops said he was fighting with another boy, a 13-year-old neighbor in the area. 

So what do you do when two boys are fighting? 

Well, if you’re the NYPD, and the boys in question are black, you throw one of them through a window, puncturing his lung. As he lies there with blood filling his lungs, you handcuff him and refuse to call an ambulance. When you do call an ambulance, you enter the protocol for an adult drunk, instead of a dying child. When the ambulance comes, you refuse to let the paramedics uncuff him. Even as the paramedics explain that this boy is dying, you argue that he’s faking it and that he deserves to die there on the street for fighting with another boy.  When you finally do let the paramedics uncuff him and take him to the hospital, you fail to report that you threw him through a glass window despite dozens of eye-witnesses reporting the opposite.  When you are called upon by the community to account for your actions, you decide to do an “internal investigation” - therefore being accountable to no one outside your division. You encourage the deregulation of police conduct and refuse to let outsiders investigate how you train your officers.

And what do you do, if you’re a concerned citizen who is tired of seeing this? You write Bill de Blasio and you ask him to start an outside investigation into police brutality.  Or at least that’s what I did. And if you want to cosign what I wrote him, you can do that here. And if you want to signal boost that for Javier Payne, you can do that too. You can sign my petition letter here.

(Photo Credit to Enid Alvarez for the New York Daily News)

booooooooooooooooooooooooooooost